Three reasons you need a safe with deposit slot

There are a wide range of safes available to purchase, but not each type will suit your requirements. With data safes, deposit safes, and fireproof safes to choose from, you need to assess your situation and work out which safe will do the job! If you work in retail or high-control environments, here are three reasons you need a safe with deposit slot.

1) Security

Deposit safes make use of a deposit slot, which allows you to deposit valuable items and money without ever opening the safe. This is great for security as employees can deposit goods into the safe, but at no point have the opportunity to withdraw from it. Only the key holder will have access to the contents, but it’s completely open for a deposit from anybody with access to the safe itself.

Imagine a deposit safe in the retail industry. You have a high turnover of cash, and tills need emptying into a safe. Instead of exposing the ever-growing pile of money sitting inside the safe, employees simply feed the money through the deposit slot. It’s the most secure safe in this scenario.

2) Convenience

A safe with deposit slot provides the utmost convenience when you deposit more than you withdraw. All you have to do is approach the safe and make use of the deposit slot!

If you didn’t have a safe with deposit slot, each employee who uses the safe would need a key providing – which comes with a whole host of risks. Keys can be lost, there may be untrustworthy people, and there’s an additional cost of getting keys cut. All-in-all, deposit safes are the best solution for retail, shops and other high-control environments.

3) Versatility

Whereas a home safe is, unsurprisingly, perfectly suited to your home – deposit safes are surprisingly versatile. While they’re ideal for retail scenarios, deposit safes can easily be used at home, in your business, and some can even be fitted in vehicles.

Vehicle deposit safes are specialist models that are ideal for use in vans and lorries on delivery rounds. They use base plates to attach to the vehicle, ensuring the safe cannot be moved without a key. The safe can be removed from the base plate while still restricting access to the contents, meaning cash is always safe – even in transit.

Hopefully now you understand the benefits of choosing a safe with deposit slot. We stock a bunch of secure deposit safes from the most trustworthy brands in the market! If you need any more information then give our friendly sales team a call on 01724 281044.

Are you about to break the law on explosives storage?

When the calendar clicked over to October 1st, you could unwittingly have broken the law – and you could still be doing it.

That was the date on which new regulations came into force for storing explosives, replacing the Approved Code of Practice to the Manufacture and Storage of Explosives Regulations 2005.

The new legislation is The Explosives Regulations 2014, and incorporates a number of changes. These are:

• Merging registrations into the licensing system

CabinetAllowing local authorities to issue licences of up to five years, aligning them with equivalent HSE/police-issued licences

• Extending licensing to address storage of ammonium nitrate blasting intermediate (ANBI)

• Exceptions for keeping desensitised explosives without a licence have been updated

• Tables of separation distances have been restructured to better allow for sites with more than one store. The tables have also been revised to cover quantities of explosives greater than 2,000kg

• A revised list of explosives that can be acquired or acquired and kept without an explosives certificate from the police.

• The repeal of the Fireworks Act 1951, as its remaining provisions have been superseded by the Pyrotechnic (Safety) Regulations 2010

More detailed guidance is in the documents L150 and L151 available from the Health and safety Executive. The former looks at safety provisions, the latter at security. It has been possible to download copies, but the HSE advises that those copies may have been subject to change before the new rules came into effect, and suggest it would be best to check.

Those affected by the new regulations particularly include employers, private individuals and other people making explosives, storing larger quantities of them, or storing explosives that present higher hazards.

Moving a safe ends with teenager’s death

The tragic death of a teenage removal worker has highlighted just how important it is to have experts with the right equipment move very heavy objects like large safes.

The 19-year-old was crushed by a safe he and colleagues were attempting to move. They were working together to maneuver the safe up a ramp into the removal van when the ramp slipped, allowing the safe to fall. The other workers were able to get out of the way, but the teenager was trapped beneath the falling safe, and although he was taken to hospital, he died there a short while later.

SafeSome safes weigh more than 500kg, and are perfectly capable of causing severe crush injuries if they are not moved with care and the right equipment. They are best moved to their final location by specialists. Great care must be taken to get all the details right when planning the delivery of a safe even something as apparently inconsequential as two or three steps might change the way delivery is made. Other considerations are parking restrictions, restricted-weight bridges, gravel drives and limited turning circles too.

Taking pains to do a job correctly is the way to make sure it is done safely, with each one requiring its own risk assessment. After all, we all want everyone to go home as fit and as healthy as when they arrived at work.

Is it time you did a COSHH assessment?

The law uses the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations to define how businesses must control substances that could be hazardous to the health of employees, their colleagues, of the wider community. The regulations, in their latest form, have been in place since 2002, so a quick refresher is sure to be helpful. It may reveal that the measures you have in place are out of date. Products change constantly, as manufacturers making improvements to existing products and introduce new ones.

What substances are covered?
These come in many forms, and include chemicals, products containing chemicals, fumes, dust, vapours, mists, gases, biological agents (germs) and nanotechnology. Specifically not covered, because they have their own regulations, are lead, asbestos and radioactive substances.

I’m self-employed. Does this apply to me?
Certainly. If you have employees, it all applies to you. If you don’t, but take hazardous substances onto other people’s premises, it all applies to you except for monitoring and health surveillance.

Things to think about before doing a COSHH assessment
What do we do that involves hazardous chemicals?
What harm can these substances cause?
How can we reduce the risk of harm?

COSHH CabinetsAre we using the right chemicals in the right form?
The range of available products is always evolving, so just because a product was the right one ten years ago doesn’t mean it’s still the best option. Manufacturers may have developed less toxic options, or more controllable forms. For example:
Can we avoid using a hazardous substance?
Does a water-based option exist?
Could we brush it on, instead of spraying it?
Could we vacuum things clean, capturing dust, rather than using a brush?
Does the chemical come in a ‘safer’ form? (a solid rather than a liquid, for instance) Keep an eye on the trade press, or talk to others at trade fairs or exhibitions.

Do I have to provide Personal Protective Equipment?
Yes. Employers must provide it for all employees, and replace it when necessary. It must be worn when all other measures are inadequate to control exposure. Advice about what is suitable is available from suppliers, manufacturers or trade associations. You must also instruct employees about how it is to be worn to make sure it is fit for purpose. It’s best to make it as comfortable as possible to ensure employees are prepared to wear it.

Are there exposure limits?
About 500 substances, of the thousands in use in industry, are covered by very specific workplace exposure limits.

What are COSHH Data sheets?
These are information about the substances you use, and describe the hazards presented by the chemicals they refer to, as well as handling and storage recommendations. It’s important to note that a COSHH data sheet is not a risk assessment. The information on the sheet should be used as part of a risk assessment.

Do I need to tell employees about these chemicals?
Yes. All employees working with, or close to, chemicals covered by the regulations need to have the information. They have a right to know the hazards, exposure limits, result of monitoring, health surveillance, and what to do in an emergency. And if you change or add a chemical, they need to be told abut that too.

Where can I find out more?
The Health & Safety Executive is a superb source of information. Visit http://www.hse.gov.uk/coshh/index.htm and http://www.hse.gov.uk/coshh/essentials/index.htm