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Letter late than never

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Without realising it most of us live our lives around of a set of routines. You know the type of thing – down the pub on Friday night, supermarket on Saturday, wash the car on Sunday and so on. I am frankly no different although when it comes to washing the car it’s twice a year whether the car needs it or not.

It is strange how a break in this routine can brighten the day. This month two seismic change events hit my village. The landlord – well lease holder – of my preferred village pub finally gave up the battle against government persecution of the drinking man and brewery avarice and called it quits. A closed pub is bad enough news but shock and horror we also have a new postman.

The landlord may have gone to new pastures but fortunately we have another pub in the village. Due to a sense of loyalty to the embattled ex landlord I have not set foot in the “other end” for a couple of years. I am quite looking forward to a change of scene for my “Friday night in the Pub” routine. A new postman is a different kettle of fish.

Post and Mail BoxesI first came upon the young chap pushing his small hatchback down Pinfold Lane. I was just about to offer to help when a villager leant over his wall and said “Don’t bother asking, he says he’s pushing it to save petrol”. Definitely a chuckle moment although not an encouraging introduction when you consider the houses in the village don’t have numbers just names. When you have a Pinfold Cottage, Pinfold House and Pinfold Gardens on the same street and four families with the same surname you need a Postie who knows his eggs from his omelettes.

Many houses also have long gated drives particularly the farms and like me don’t have a door letterbox so over time we have resorted to leaving a variety of receptacles for the Post on the road side, tea chests, biscuit tins and old wooden boxes amongst others.  At an impromptu alfresco parish meeting as we observed the postman’s painful progress into the distance it was decided that it may be prudent to encourage the populace to write the householder name or at least the words “Deliver Post Here” on the makeshift post boxes.  I obviously suggested we also point out that purpose made post boxes don’t cost the earth and are a good deal more stylish, secure and weather proof than a biscuit tin.

This morning I noticed that the Postman has devised a cunning plan to avoid pushing his car. He was loading a bicycle out of the hatchback which he then used to deliver post to a dozen or so houses. He then put the bike back in the car drove down the road a hundred yards and then repeated the process. No doubt he will develop a routine that suits him given time.

Data breach – theft of Digital Data records

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Confidence in the security of online digital networks took a heavy blow with the recent disclosure that hackers had breached Sony’s Play Station Network and taken account details of close to 25 million users worldwide including some credit card details. After some huffing and puffing about the safety of its data encryption, yesterday, Sony finally came clean and admitted that some 12,700 encrypted credit card details and over 10000 direct debit details were also stolen during the two day cyber attack. All the affected data apparently came from an outdated 2007 database. Less than 4 years old and obsolete -that’s the digital age for you!!

It also goes to show that our increasing reliance on digital storage is providing a bonanza for ever more sophisticated thieves and that the current preference to store sensitive information on our computers, pen drives and on our providers remote servers makes it far more accessible than the unfashionable paper files in the drawer approach.

Not much you can do about your personal data stored on someone else’s database other than to not sign up in the first place but you should review the security of your own data storage to ensure that a would be thief is at least made to work for his spoils. Small things like changing file access and site login passwords on a regular basis and setting a screen password on your computer can thwart the casual thief.

Laptop Security CabinetsOf course you should also make sure that your laptop is stored securely when not in use. The theft of the whole kit and caboodle can cause havoc particularly to businesses but also other high volume users like schools and colleges.

If the company laptops remain on the premises they can be stored in a purpose made Laptop Security Cabinet or Locker. You can get versions that also charge the laptops ready for the next shift.  If you have highly confidential or sensitive info stored you can go one step further and use a Laptop Safe. These are also ideal for home office users as they can double up for storage of cash and valuables.

And finally be more diligent before giving your credit and debit card details and any personal info online. Look for evidence of independent site security verification like the McAfee Secure and Safebuy icons.

Transporting Firearms

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I have previously provided a summary of the current secure storage requirement needed for general storage of firearms and ammunition in the home. Of course most gun owners will at some point need to transport their firearm to a shoot or gun club.  When transporting in a vehicle or on public transport you must exercise a duty of care to ensure the firearm, ammunition or shotgun is kept safe. By taking the following precautions you can demonstrate to the Firearms Officer that you meet this duty of care.

Shotgun Storage Safes and CabinetsKeep your shotgun in an appropriate case or cover whilst transporting it and place it out of sight, preferably in the locked boot or other secure load carrying area of the vehicle. You should never transport a loaded shotgun and the ammunition should ideally be stored separately again in a locked compartment hidden from plain sight.

Vehicles used frequently, particularly those used for transporting large numbers of firearms, should preferably be fitted with an immobiliser and /or alarm with provision for securing the shotgun to the structure of the vehicle in a purpose made security case or attached to the frame by a steel clamp.

If you leave your firearm in an unattended vehicle for any reason remove the firing mechanism or other vital part of the firearm such as the fore-end of a shotgun and keep it on your person. It is important when taking a shotgun to a location that involves an overnight stay that you ensure in advance that the premises has secure storage facilities. Leaving your firearm in the care of a hotel or friends house, even in a safe will expose them to a charge of unlawful possession unless they are also certificate holders.

The above safety recommendations apply equally to the transportation of Section 1 firearms. Section 1 firearms include rifles, any shotgun with a barrel shorter than 24″ or a semi-auto or pump-action gun and any shotgun with a detachable magazine. Air rifles which exceed the 12ft/lb power output limit are also considered ‘Section 1’ firearms.  Although there is no specific security requirement for air weapons owners are advised to store them securely so that they may not be stolen or misused by another person so generally you are advised to make no real distinction between air rifles and more powerful guns for which you need a licence – they are all considered firearms.

You can transport a gun on public transport provided that it is held in a secure gun case or slip cover, is unloaded and the firing mechanism is removed and held separately so the gun cannot be fired. The firearm should remain with the certificate holder at all times other than when transporting by plane although another shotgun certificate holder may transport or borrow your shotgun without entering it onto their certificate, providing they are in possession of the gun for less than 72 hours. If they are in possession for longer the gun must be entered onto their certificate and the local firearms licensing officer informed.

Of course none of the above applies to handguns, loosely defined as any firearm with an overall length of less than 30 cm, as ownership is against the law in England other than under exceptional circumstances.

Gadget Show A Safe Bet

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Fans who consider both this website and The Gadget Show on Channel 5 as “must sees” will have been given a treat when the erstwhile team of presenters were each given the challenge of breaking into a high security safe. If they failed to crack their respective safes the contents – apparently embarrassing clips of their previous incarnations on the Box – would be posted on YouTube or the like.

I was heartened that three of the 5 high security safes provided for the challenge are available from this website, the Phoenix CitadelSentry QE Datasafe, SecureLine Professional S2 and the mighty Burton Magnum.

Any professional Locksmiths and Safe Crackers viewing proceedings would no doubt have been entirely unimpressed by the efforts of the motley crew. At the outset they dismissed the prospect of manipulating the lock wheel pack as too fiddly and proceeded to try and simply destroy the safes.  In sequence they first used a digger and bucket to drop from a “great height” which looked like about 15 foot, they then attacked the casing with an angle grinder which was no match for the cobalt steel plate reinforcing and finally tried to blow the safe door off using PETN an industrial explosive.

Needless to say not one of the safes was opened in the process not even the traditional key lock Secureline Professional cash Safe. The Gadget Show team may have been better advised to do some research on the design of combination locks and the intricacies of contact points, drive pins and fences.

To be fair the most popular method of safecracking is to simply steal the safe and move it to where the safecracker has the time and equipment to take the safe apart. This is not always that easy if the safe owner takes advantage of the secure boltdown facility on most safes – they would have to remove part of the floor or wall along with the safe. In these circumstances the safecracker must attack the locking mechanism the majority of which like the Burton Magnum have already survived rigorous attack testing to BS1143-1.

Despite the high security of the safes chosen every safe must be accessible in some way to a locksmith in the event of a malfunction or lock-out. This requirement introduces a fundamental weakness that forms the basis of the locksmiths art and the would-be safecracker. However it is an art and there is apparently a world champion safe breaker to prove it in the guise of American Jeff Sitar who is by the way gainfully and legitimately employed as a locksmith.

To view the Gadget Show video follow this link http://fwd.channel5.com/gadget-show/videos/challenge/surprise-special-part-3

Gas Cylinders cause major disruption

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Hundreds of residents were forced to evacuate their homes last week after a series of explosions were detonated by a fierce fire at a West Yorkshire transport company in North Featherstone. A total of sixty-two properties in the town were evacuated as a precaution whilst fire fighters cooled several acetylene cylinders at the premises that were in danger of exploding.

Some thirty fire fighters drawn from the nearby towns of Featherstone, Pontefract, Castleford and Knottingley tackled the fire and prevented several nearby homes from being overwhelmed by the flames. Several streets within a 200metre exclusion zone surrounding the works were also cordoned off and residents were not allowed back until the Friday evening as according to brigade safety procedures, acetylene cylinders must be cooled for 24 hours before they can be safely removed.

Acetylene is used extensively in industrial applications for steel cutting and welding and it is surprising how many fire incidents result. The London Fire brigade for example on average anticipates a call out every three weeks. Given the potential risk to personnel and consequent disruption to business activity it is important to consider the safe storage  of acetylene and other explosive gases as part of your fire risk assessment in compliance with the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 and the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002.

Ordinarily this will require you to provide a dedicated secure storage facility external to the building or if internal then in a locked room separated from the other parts of the building by fire resisting walls and doors with adequate ventilation to the atmosphere. As a general guide cylinders should not be stored with other combustible goods, empty cylinders should be stored separate from full ones and their location should be indicated by appropriate signage.

Making these provisions can be a very expensive exercise and in a major fire incident still may not be sufficient to prevent major disruption to your ability to trade. There is an alternative in the form of purpose made fireproof cylinder cabinets to BS EN14470-2 that meet or exceed current Safety legislation and are designed to allow the storage of cylinders indoors. The ground breaking Asecos Type G90 Fireproof Gas Cylinder Cabinets are independently fire chamber tested to BS EB14470-2 to prove that in a fire the temperature increase within the cabinet remains below 50 deg C for at least 90 minutes to allow sufficient time for safe evacuation and for the emergency services to attend.  Ordinarily in the majority of cases this will also be sufficient time for the fire to be brought under control avoiding the 24 hour “cooling off” period.

The G90 also has practical user friendly features including multiple lead in apertures for connecting pipes, manifolds and sensors for up to 4 cylinders, integral air extraction, automatic open arrest door closing system and an interior fitted rolling ramp.

Safe Storage of Hazardous Chemicals

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With such a wide range of hazardous chemical storage cabinets available it is understandable that it is not always crystal clear which chemicals are safe to store together. Flammable substances, Acids, Alkalis, Toxics and oxidising agents are all chemicals of one type or another but may be incompatible and dangerous to store together. The following information gives some guidance on the basic principles for the safe storage and segregation but should not be taken as exhaustive.

As a rule store like materials with like and always segregate incompatible substances to prevent dangerous interactions. All chemicals storage containers should have a label on them identifying their hazard category (e.g. flammable, acid, alkali, oxidising, toxic etc.) It is always recommended to examine the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and manufacturers recommendations for more specific and detailed information.

Flammable solvents should be stored in specialised metal flammable solvent cabinets that are clearly labelled. The vapour forming above the liquid of these solvents represents the main danger from an accidental ignition source -even a spark. Ideally position the cabinet away from doors or other means of escape from the laboratory. DSEAR recommends that no more than 50 litres of highly flammable material may be kept in a flammable cabinet in any one room to reduce the risk of a serious fire. Quantities of other compatible flammable substances with a higher flashpoint up to a total of 200 litres may be added.

Flammable solvents must never be stored with oxidising agents such as bleach, hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid or reducing agents and concentrated acids (e.g. concentrated sulphuric and hydrochloric acids).

Because violent chemical reactions can result Chlorinated flammable substances (like trichloroethylene) are best stored in ventilated cabinets separately from flammable (non-chlorinated) solvents. In addition they should not be stored with alkali metals such as lithium, potassium or sodium, since any mixing can result in an explosion.  They can be stored in sealed metal cabinets if ventilated storage is not available.

Acids and alkalis are both potentially corrosive substances. Although specialist so called “Acid/Alkali” cabinets are available this does not mean acids and alkalis should be stored together. They should be stored separately since any accidental mixing of particularly concentrated materials can generate large quantities of heat and fumes. They can be stored separately in a vented or metal cabinet so long as they are in a segregated containment tray to prevent any spillages.

Oxidising substances (e.g. peroxides and nitrates) should be stored in a COSHH metal cabinet well away from organic matter such as wood and paper. As a rule oxidising agents should never be stored in a wooden cabinet. Oxidising agents should also never be stored with flammable solvents or reducing agents since a fire or explosion can result, particularly if a spillage occurs, even without a naked flame or heat present.

The above is a quick overview on what can be a complicated subject but the main point to remember is the incorrect storage or mixing of hazardous chemicals can result in disastrous consequences so check the chemicals’ MSDS before deciding on your haz-chem storage solution.

Gun Safety

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Some readers who are holders of firearms certificates may not be aware of the implications of the legal precedent set by the Court of Appeal case that I came upon recently involving a Mr Farrer back in 1999.

Mr Farrer, a Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County of Essex no less and a pillar of the community kept his shotgun in a purpose made police approved gun cabinet at his house in Essex where his aged mother also lived in an adjacent cottage. As is their right firearms officers called unannounced to confirm the gun was being stored safely in compliance with the Firearms legislation.

Mr Farrer was not at home so the mother, who knew where the key was, kindly offered to open the cabinet for inspection. On hearing of this the Chief Constable revoked Mr Farrer’s gun licence. The reason for this revocation was that he had allowed his mother – a person holding no shotgun certificate – access to his shotgun. The Crown Court ultimately upheld his decision concluding Mr. Farrer was in breach of the terms of his Shotgun Certificate by virtue of “not having it stored securely so as to prevent, as far as reasonably practicable, access to the shotgun by an unauthorised person”. This ruling has implications for all certificate holders as in effect technically you cannot entrust your gun or ammunition cabinet key or even knowledge of it whereabouts to anyone. What happens on your ultimate demise is unclear.

There is also the scenario where more than one member of the household has a firearms certificate and their guns are stored in a shared extra deep capacity shotgun cabinet or gun safe. They should consider having their guns cross catalogued on each certificate or risk falling foul of the letter of the law as interpreted by a zealous Chief Constable with an inbuilt and understandable prejudice against gun ownership of any kind.

You might also check the small print of your vehicle insurance as some insurers include an additional exclusion clause against carrying any goods for which you need a police licence including firearms ammunition.

Readers should be aware of their legal obligations and realise that their Firearms Certificate is as safe as the secure storage of their firearms and the care they take when they are in use or in transit.  The Firearms Act 1968 and the Firearms Rules 1998 contain the applicable law. More details can be found at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

 

Securing the Tools of the Trade

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While I was wiling away the dregs of an evening watching a late night repeat of the Antiques Roadshow my attention was suddenly caught by a large elongate wooden chest being appraised by one of the experts. It turned out to be an early 19th Century sailor’s sea chest.

The expert explained in some detail the waterproof pitch pine construction which was virtually rot proof and made the chest very heavy to prevent it sliding around below decks in a swell. He explained the braided rope handles at either end covered in tar pitch apparently recycled from old mast rigging and the reinforced cast metal strapping and heavy lock to deter theft of the few possessions and tools of the trade the sailor had.

Would you believe it but I have one that looked very similar also in pitch pine complete with braided rope handles that was gifted to me by a retired shipwright.  Too much of a coincidence but I suspect mine is probably not as old but nevertheless used to this day to lock away my more expensive tools.

Of course these day’s hens teeth are easier to find than 18″ planks of pitch pine and the valuation on the box was in the high hundreds so out of reach for many. If you are looking for a land based equivalent for secure tool storage modern technology and design comes to the rescue and you can now buy tool strong boxes at a fraction of the cost of the old sea chest. For tradesmen who routinely take expensive kit to site on open trucks they can secure their equipment with van strong boxes that feature prise resistant lids and bolt down holes to secure the box to the truck. The rope handles have been replaced with solid welded steel but otherwise like the sea chest they are eminently portable

The sailor was probably not that concerned about someone stealing his sea chest – just the contents. After all where would you conceal it on board a ship assuming one man could lift it in the first instance? Mere landlubbers need to take security to a different level.

 

Fire Safety Cabinets

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Over the weekend the element in the main oven of my cooker gave up the ghost. We had a logistical challenge trying to cook the full monty Sunday roast dinner using just the small oven and hob but happily all went well.

I ordered the replacement part from espares a great site that I have used before. They often have cheaper OEM versions and the site includes handy videos showing how to fit common parts.

When I checked the part I found the element pumped out 2500watts and it occurred to me that the cooker was effectively a fireproof cabinet in reverse. Of course the maximum temperature inside is only around 240 deg C way below the 700-1000 degrees generated in a fire but given that the heat is retained for hours on end without raising the exterior skin to dangerous levels it is still pretty impressive although not in the same league as our fireproof flammables storage cabinets.

When choosing a cabinet for storage of flammable substances it’s easy to be confused by the range on offer and particularly what Fireproof actually means. There are three basic cabinet types – Fire Resistant, Flameproof and Fireproof. So what’s the difference?

Fire resistant cabinets are generally compliant with British Standard BS 476. This standard is not based on the fire integrity of the whole cabinet but defines the fire resistant qualities of the materials used in its construction. A fire resistant cabinet to BS470 will be made of materials that will retain their integrity for 30 mins in your average fire at a nominal 750 deg C. Which in plain speak means the materials will not melt or warp. COSHH compliant cabinets for the storage and segregation of hazardous goods – with the exception of flammables – fall into this category but the single skin construction does not prevent the build-up of heat inside the cabinet for any length of time. They are neither guaranteed flameproof or fireproof.

Flame Proof cabinets, often termed flammable(s) storage cabinets, intended specifically for the storage of flammable substances have to comply with the DSEAR (Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002) that specifies design features intended to segregate flammable substances from accidental exposure to flames from work activity or accidental fire and to prevent environmental pollution. The joints between the sides, top and bottom of flammables safety cabinets and bins should be seam welded or at least free from openings or gaps, and should be close rebated against the frame such that there is overlap between the frame and lids /doors in their closed position. In addition flammables storage cabinets must have a liquid tight sump with a volume at least 110% of the largest stored container. Tray like spill shelves are also incorporated. The supports and fastenings must be of a material with a melting point greater than 750 deg C. Again these are more often single skin cabinets that are Fire Resistant and Flameproof but not Fireproof.

Fireproof cabinets not only segregate highly flammable substances (HFS’s) as required by COSHH and DSEAR they also protect the contents from the intense heat of a fire for a defined period. BS EN14470-1 is the applicable standard. The multi skinned and insulated construction prevents the interior cabinet temperature from rising above 180 deg C for a set period defined by the fire rating of the cabinet – i.e. from 15 to 90 minutes. These cabinets also have automatic heat activated self closing safety doors and air ventilation /extraction and are commonly used in laboratories and hazardous process industries to safeguard workers and reduce valuable asset losses in the event of fire. The sophisticated fireproof qualities of BS EN14470-1 cabinets allow users to exceed the 50 litres maximum volume of HFS’s recommended for storage in any workroom.

 

To insure your cash is Safe

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Many businesses, particularly in the retail and leisure sectors, insure against theft out of necessity as having cash on the premises is a magnet for thieves. With savings interest rates and confidence in Banks at all time lows, apparently many householders are also reverting to the old days and stashing any spare cash in the mattress. If they are relying on a general household insurance policy to protect their nest egg they could be disappointed

Insurance is all about risk assessment and the higher the risk generally the more premium you will pay. In addition the insurance companies will be quick to find a get out clause if reasonable precautions are not taken to minimise the risk.  If you have failed to inform them that the risk even exists don’t expect your policy to pay out.

A lockable cash box is OK for small amounts of cash to allow day to day trading or to deposit the odd days shopping float, but larger amounts held overnight should be locked in a safe. It may not be common knowledge but any type of safe won’t do. If you want no quibble insurance cover the safe should be approved by the insurance company as suitable for the amount of cash you wish to secure. I am reminded of one chap who purchased what I would generously describe as a “budget” safe from a very well known retailer to house his daily takings of under £1000. The insurance assessor took one look at the safe and shook his head. The lock mechanism was gravity operated so he just turned the safe onto its top and the door opened with minimal effort.

This is an extreme case as there is a good choice of quality value for money cash safes available like our Sentry cash safes and Burtons excellent Torino and Magnum ranges. Once the cash held exceeds £5000 you may well consider a Eurograde Safe. Eurograde classified safes range from Grade 0 to Grade 6 and are accepted by virtually all major insurance companies as of a build quality and attack resistance to secure cash amounts ranging from £6000 to £150000 depending on the Grade. As a general rule you can multiply the cash amount by 10 to arrive at the amount of non cash valuables the safe can hold.

All of these safes also come with internal bolt down facility as to meet insurance company requirements it is recommended that any safe weighing under 1000kg should be securely bolted to the floor or wall or both. Be you a business or thrifty homeowner looking to upgrade from the mattress, make sure that your safe is fit for purpose and your insurance is adequate to cover your losses if the worst happens.

 

 

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