Water resistant storage a bigger priority

At long last Summer has arrived, at least for a day or two. River levels are falling and the farmers may at last be able to get onto their fields to harvest crops. It’s easy to forget that many businesses are still cleaning up from the devastating floods that hit many towns and villages earlier this month.

Although insurance will cover the cost of reinstatement, for the majority this will do little to help the business return to normal trading or replace business critical documents and customer records lost in the deluge. It is also an ever present worry that once at risk further flood events are likely to reoccur in the future.

Businesses in risk areas should consider additional measures to protect their operations so that normal service can be resumed as soon as possible. Fortunately there are a range of waterproof safety storage options to protect documents, cash and valuables from as little as £50 or so. All have the considerable added benefit of providing fire protection.

A Sentry or Phoenix portable waterproof document box and cash box come in a range of sizes ideal for the small business providing both water damage protection and security against unauthorised access. If you have larger quantities of paper based records and files that would be difficult to remove from the premises in a flood alert a waterproof filing cabinet such as the Sentry vertical file cabinet or the innovative Phoenix World Class lateral drawer model, is an effective safeguard against both flood and fire.

Businesses holding significant cash or water sensitive valuables such as electronic devices and digital media on the premises should consider a waterproof safe with bolt down facility. Advances in design and technology means they are now an affordable option for even the smallest business. The Burton Aquasec will withstand total submersion in water, is certified for 60minutes fire protection and at less than £250 is surprisingly cost effective.

If the climatologists are to be believed extreme and freakish weather is likely to become the norm in the years ahead so business attitudes to risk and preventive actions must adapt to safeguard business viability.

Letter late than never

Without realising it most of us live our lives around of a set of routines. You know the type of thing – down the pub on Friday night, supermarket on Saturday, wash the car on Sunday and so on. I am frankly no different although when it comes to washing the car it’s twice a year whether the car needs it or not.

It is strange how a break in this routine can brighten the day. This month two seismic change events hit my village. The landlord – well lease holder – of my preferred village pub finally gave up the battle against government persecution of the drinking man and brewery avarice and called it quits. A closed pub is bad enough news but shock and horror we also have a new postman.

The landlord may have gone to new pastures but fortunately we have another pub in the village. Due to a sense of loyalty to the embattled ex landlord I have not set foot in the “other end” for a couple of years. I am quite looking forward to a change of scene for my “Friday night in the Pub” routine. A new postman is a different kettle of fish.

Post and Mail BoxesI first came upon the young chap pushing his small hatchback down Pinfold Lane. I was just about to offer to help when a villager leant over his wall and said “Don’t bother asking, he says he’s pushing it to save petrol”. Definitely a chuckle moment although not an encouraging introduction when you consider the houses in the village don’t have numbers just names. When you have a Pinfold Cottage, Pinfold House and Pinfold Gardens on the same street and four families with the same surname you need a Postie who knows his eggs from his omelettes.

Many houses also have long gated drives particularly the farms and like me don’t have a door letterbox so over time we have resorted to leaving a variety of receptacles for the Post on the road side, tea chests, biscuit tins and old wooden boxes amongst others.  At an impromptu alfresco parish meeting as we observed the postman’s painful progress into the distance it was decided that it may be prudent to encourage the populace to write the householder name or at least the words “Deliver Post Here” on the makeshift post boxes.  I obviously suggested we also point out that purpose made post boxes don’t cost the earth and are a good deal more stylish, secure and weather proof than a biscuit tin.

This morning I noticed that the Postman has devised a cunning plan to avoid pushing his car. He was loading a bicycle out of the hatchback which he then used to deliver post to a dozen or so houses. He then put the bike back in the car drove down the road a hundred yards and then repeated the process. No doubt he will develop a routine that suits him given time.